DEC archiving project at the Computer History Museum

The Computer History Museum (Mountain View CA) recently completed a large archiving project that consisted mostly of documents and photos donated to the museum by the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), which was headquartered in Boston and existed as a company from about 1950 through about 1998. DEC was one of the computer giants of its day, second only to IBM.

Dick and Anna participated in the project for its entire duration, which was about two years. The project contributed 20,000 new items to the museum’s database.

Table set up to do archiving in the Computer History Museum collection
Table set up to do archiving in the Computer History Museum collection
One of the photographs from the DEC collection: participants in a sales training class in the 1980s
One of the photographs from the DEC collection: participants in a sales training class in the 1980s

Anker-Werke banking machine

One of the more interesting objects in the Computer History Museum’s SAP collection is a banking machine made by Anker-Werke, a German company with an interesting history that used to be headquartered in Bielefeld, North-Rhine Westphalia.

Anker-Werke logo
Anker-Werke logo

The company was founded in 1876 by Carl Schmidt as a knitting machine factory. Besides knitting machines [Nähmaschinen] the company has also made cash registers [Registrierkassen], ticket and reservation machines [Buchungsmaschinen], small motorcycles [Kleinmotorräder], and bicycles [Fahrräder].

Banking machine
Banking machine

After World War II Anker-Werke focused exclusively on office machines. In 1976 the company was liquidated. Part of the business was sold to the British firm Thomas Tilling, and the rest now belongs to technology giant Oracle.